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Rebellion June 5, 1837     
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Detail from Hunting Indians with Bloodhounds
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Detail from "Hunting Indians in Florida with Bloodhounds," a lithograph on the war published by James Baillie in 1848. Jesup only contemplated the use of bloodhounds, based on his knowledge of the 2nd Maroon War of Jamaica, but Zachary Taylor tried to employ them, as discussed later. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZ62-89725.
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With his peace plan suddenly in ruins, Jesup fell into a violent depression. "I have the honor to report," he sarcastically wrote to a colleague, "that this campaign ... has entirely failed." He blamed especially the Black Seminoles:

"All is lost, and principally ... by the influence of the Negroes."

Jesup's mood turned dark. He sought relief from command. In desperation he contemplated extreme actions -- hanging all captives, sending bloodhounds against the enemy, even pursuing a war of extermination.

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Sources: ASPMA 7: 811, 838-39, 872, Giddings Exiles 155, Mahon 204.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion

Sidetrack(s)

Context in which Jesup pondered extreme actions

Jesup suggests concessions to the Indians and blacks