spacer
Rebellion April 8, 1837     
spacer
spacerspacer
spacerHomespacer spacerOverviewspacer spacerTrail Narrativespacer spacerHighlightsspacer spacerMapsspacer spacerResourcesspacer spacerImagesspacer spacer
spacer
Coa Hadjo
spacer
Coa Hadjo. Oil painting by George Catlin, 1838. Smithsonian American Art Museum.
View an image enlargement
spacer
Previous slide Next slide
Betrayal slide ticker

The turning point came on April 8. Under pressure from local and national politicians, Jesup entered into a secret agreement with Coa Hadjo, one of the chiefs friendly to the Americans. On behalf of the tribe, Coa Hadjo agreed to turn over all "captured Negroes" and return them to whites. In theory, this only included blacks who had escaped to the Seminoles during the war. In practice, the distinction was almost impossible to enforce -- nor was it popular with the militant allies.

Previous slidespacerspacer




Sources: A&NC 4: 265, ASPMA 7: 867, Giddings Exiles 148, Mahon 202, Niles National Register June 3 1837: 213.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
spacer spacer
 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion