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Rebellion December 8, 1836     
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General Jesup and President Jackson
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General Thomas Sydney Jesup (left) and President Jackson. One of the least political generals in the Army, Jesup had a reputation for action and probity, which appealed to the president. He was also intimate with newspaper editor Frank Blair, one of Jackson's staunchest supporters.
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On December 8, Andrew Jackson's new man, General Thomas Sydney Jesup, took command in Florida. "I have tried all the Generals," wrote Jackson, "and as Genl Jesup is now there he I hope will finish this unfortunate business."

Jesup was determined to correct the errors of his predecessors. From the start, he showed a clear understanding of the conflict, warning colleagues:

"This, you may be assured, is a negro, not an Indian war; and if it be not speedily put down, the south will feel the effects of it on their slave population before the end of the next season."

He would prove the most effective officer in the war and the most controversial.

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Sources: Jackson 5: 434, ASPMA 7: 159, 821, Giddings Exiles 135, Mahon 193.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion

Sidetrack(s)

Longer excerpt and context of Jesup's observation