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Rebellion February 1836     
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Long Jack, Chief Billy Bowlegs' Lieutenant, circa 1858
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Long Jack, a Seminole Warrior, circa 1858. Florida Photographic Collection.
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By February, full-fledged war had broken out. The early victories encouraged the Seminoles. But how, realistically, could they expect to defeat the Americans? From a combined population of 4800 Indians and blacks, the allies could muster only a thousand able warriors. Yet they were opposing 34,000 Floridians receiving national support, with more help on the way.

Fortunately for the Seminoles, Florida had a problem: of its 34,000 residents, 16,000 were slaves.

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Sources: Fifth Census 157.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
spacer spacer War Erupts
"Massacre"
Withlacoochee
Key Actors
Florida
Slave Uprising
Army Response
National Mood
Distractions
Seminole Success
+ Deceit
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion