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Rebellion June - November 1836     
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Seminole woman by George Catlin

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"A Seminole Woman," 1838 oil painting by George Catlin. Smithsonian American Art Museum.
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Over the summer and fall of 1836, while politicians in Washington debated the war and held anguished inquiries into the Army's failed tactics, the Seminoles enjoyed a hard-fought freedom. The Army could muster only limited engagements. For six months, officers failed almost entirely even to find the enemy. The Seminoles, meanwhile, remained ensconced in their inland fastnesses. Safely concealed, they planted crops, hunted game, and renewed family life in temporary camps and villages.

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Sources: Mahon 159-89.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
spacer spacer War Erupts
"Massacre"
Withlacoochee
Key Actors
Florida
Slave Uprising
Army Response
National Mood
Distractions
Seminole Success
+ Deceit
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion