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Rebellion March 6, 1837     
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Joshua Reed Giddings
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The face of Joshua Reed Giddings, from a daguerreotype produced by Matthew Brady's studio between 1844 and 1860. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZ62-110107.
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Sidetrack:
Giddings describes the Articles as a victory for the Black Seminoles

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In his history of the Black Seminoles, whom he called the "Exiles," the antislavery activist Giddings described the Articles of Capitulation as an undisputed policy victory for the black rebels:

"Under these articles, the Exiles were to enjoy that security for which they had contended for a century and a half. It was for this that their ancestors left South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and Florida; to attain it, they were willing to leave the graves of their fathers -- the country in which they had lived during many generations. Abraham now entered upon the work of inducing all his brethren, both Indians and negroes, to go to the Western Country, where they could be free from persecutions."

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Sources: Giddings Exiles 140-41.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion

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