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Rebellion 1826 - 1834     
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A Florida savannah, by Catlin

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"Beautiful Savannah in the Pine Woods of Florida." Oil painting by George Catlin, 1834-35.  Smithsonian American Art Museum - Permission requested.
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Peace

After 1826, John Horse dropped from recorded history until 1835. Based on oral traditions and facts known later, this was a period of comparative peace and prosperity. Sometime in his late teens he married, reportedly to a daughter of the Indian chief Holatoochee, a relative of Micanopy. By the time John Horse re-entered the historical record, he had a child, a herd of some 90 cattle, and a growing reputation as an interpreter for the tribe. After a youth of wartime migrations and violence, he had begun to build a life in what remained of Florida's once-free wilderness. That wilderness was about to close, and John Horse's life was about to change forever.

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Sources: Porter Black 31, 37.
Part 1, Early Years: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 - Early Years: 1832-1838
+ World at Birth
+ Encroaching America
+ A New Country
spacer spacer Annexation
Moultrie Creek
Slave Raiders
Abraham
Gopher John
Peace
 + War: 1832-1838
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion