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Rebellion 1800 - 1835     
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Payne's Prairie
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Fertile land on the Alachua savannah in Payne's Prairie State Preserve. Photo by Brad Sanders, from the Travels of William Bartram Web site of the Bartram Trail Conference, Inc.
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Living Conditions slide ticker

Under their lenient arrangements with the Indians, the Black Seminoles prospered. Lt. McCall recorded his impressions in 1826:

"We found these negroes in possession of large fields of the finest land, producing large crops of corn, beans, melons, pumpkins, and other esculent vegetables. [I] saw, while riding along the borders of the ponds, fine rice growing; and in the village large corn-cribs were filled, while the houses were larger and more comfortable than those of the Indians themselves."

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Sources: McCall 160.
Part 1, Early Years: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 - Early Years: 1832-1838
+ World at Birth
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Seminole Slavery
Living Conditions
Afro-Indian Culture
+ Encroaching America
+ A New Country
 + War: 1832-1838
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion