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March 9, 2013
Finding Florida Tells True Story of Sunshine State
Journalist and noted author T.D. Allman's latest book, Finding Florida, goes behind the myths and lies of Florida history. His insightful, provocative, and at times howlingly funny book includes great sections touching on the history of the Black Seminole maroons and Seminole Indians. Prominent segments bring fresh research and great storytelling to bear on the Patriot invasion of 1812-1814, the destruction of the Negro Fort, and the course of the Second Seminole War. Some of the many reviews of the book are linked below, along with the publisher's website.
Miami Times l Daily Beast l Orlando Weekly l Publisher's Site

January 31, 2013
Black Seminoles Mark History
Native Americans and Black Seminoles recently commemorated the two 1838 military engagements when 300 Native and African-American Seminoles made a major stand against 1,500 U.S. troops and Tennessee volunteers in a combination of two battles fought on the banks of the Loxahatchee, or “River of Turtles,” in northern Palm Beach County.
South Florida Times

March 2012
Black Seminole FAQ Translated Into Haitian Creole
For a project called "Geek Science," Susan Basen has translated the FAQ overview of the Black Seminoles from the Rebellion site into Haitian Creole. "Geek Science" is a freemium-model non-English language orientated startup with collection of scientific articles, personal notes, and online content entries in several languages that is collaboratively edited by volunteers from around the world.
"Kesyon yo poze souvan (FAQ)," Geek Science, March 2012

March 2011
The Seminole-African Alliance
The Native American Indian people that comprised the Seminole Nation grew out of the Creek Nation in Florida. Multilingual and diverse, the Seminoles (from a word meaning “runaway”) became infamous for intermingling with runaway slaves from Georgia and the Carolinas — slaves that, as historian William Loren Katz explains, “since 1738 had built prosperous, free, self-governing communities.”
The Beachside resident, Issue 1, Vol. 7, March 2011

Sept. 26, 2010
Battlefield area officially part of history
After 10 years of negotiations to change the name of the Riverbend Park to one of historic significance, the Palm Beach County Historic Resources Review Board voted in favor of the county's proposal to change the name of 63 acres that included the Seminole Wars battlefields, to Loxahatchee River Battlefield Park.
By Richard J. Procyk, Treasure Coast Newspapers

Nov. 18, 2009
Army Recognizes Contributions of Black Seminole Indian Scouts
A formal Army recognition ceremony was conducted by the U.S. Army's Freedom Team Salute program on the campus of Saint Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. to honor the legacy of the Black Seminole Indian Scouts. William Shields, one of the scouts, was buried in the cemetery on the hospital's campus in 1910. Freedom Team Salute helped dedicate a new headstone for Shields and recognized members of the Buffalo Soldiers with Freedom Team Salute Commendations. William "Dub" Warrior, Chief of the John Horse Band of Black Seminoles; Colonel David Griffith, Director of Freedom Team Salute; Buffalo Soldiers; and a historian participated in the ceremony.
Defense & Aerospace Week

Jan. 1, 2009
Book Review: BUFFALO SOLDIERS IN THE WEST: A Black Soldiers Anthology
Professors Bruce A. Glasrud and Michael N. Searles, nationally recognized experts on blacks in the west, have compiled an anthology that chronicles the complete gambit of experiences encountered by the black soldier in the west. The anthology presents the Buffalo Soldier's story as told by 16 black soldier scholars in as many essays. The authors set out to compile a history of the "African Americans in the latter years of the nineteenth and early 20th century who were primarily engaged in Soldiering in the western United States."
By Gerald F. Sewell, Military Review

Nov. 29, 2008
Escape Becomes Etched in History
Scuffling softly, silently, under a dark, moonless November sky, a handful of men and women roped down the steep, rough coquina wall of the gray fort, then faded into the shadows, and into Florida history. Among the Seminole escapees were Coacoochee and John Horse. The remarkable story of the only known escape from the 17th-century Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine is an integral part of the National Monument’s legacy. “Coacoochee was undoubtedly one of the most accomplished Native Americans of the 19th century,” said J.B. Bird.
By Ronald Williamson, Daytona Beach News Journal

March 1, 2007
Review of this Web site: Florida's Forgotten Rebels: Rediscovering the most successful slave revolt in American history
John Horse's story feels like an answer to every Hollywood studio's wish list: a mix of Spartacus, Braveheart, Amistad, and Glory, with just a pinch of Dances With Wolves. A sweeping tale of a decades-long struggle against oppression, the movie would show how Horse and the Black Seminoles created the largest haven for runaway slaves in the American South, led the biggest slave revolt in U.S. history, won the only emancipation of rebellious North American slaves before the Civil War, and formed the largest mass exodus of slaves in U.S. history.
By Amy Sturgis, Reason Magazine

February 22, 2006
Sarasota County's underground railroad: New documentary unearths Angola
Before Florida was a state, it was home to runaway slaves. The Underground Railroad and its part in Florida's history has recently been unearthed in Sarasota County. Diverse groups seeking freedom from the states and territories with institutionalized slavery traveled the Underground Railroad south to 'free' Florida. They established the settlement of Angola which archaeologists believe spanned from Tampa to Sarasota County. (“Looking for Angola” is scheduled to air on WEDU, West Central Florida’s primary PBS station, at 9:30 p.m. Feb. 23, 11:30 p.m. Feb. 24, 1:30 p.m. Feb. 26 and 2:30 p.m. Feb. 28.)
By Shelley Draper, Charlotte Sun-Herald

February 22, 2006
UCF Anthropology Professor Featured in Documentary About Black Seminoles
Rosalyn Howard, an assistant professor of Anthropology at UCF, will be featured in the documentary “Looking for Angola,” which profiles the community of Seminole Indians and former enslaved Africans believed to be located near Tampa and Sarasota during the 19th century. “Looking for Angola” is scheduled to air on WEDU, West Central Florida’s primary PBS station, at 9:30 p.m. Feb. 23, 11:30 p.m. Feb. 24, 1:30 p.m. Feb. 26 and 2:30 p.m. Feb. 28.
University of Central Florida News Office

August 29, 2005
Blood Feud
Once paragons of racial inclusion and assimilation, the Native American sovereign nations have done an about-face and systematically pushed out people of African descent. For the better part of the 20th century, black Indians were permitted to vote in elections, sit on tribal councils, and receive benefits. Now, in the wake of lucrative government settlements and solid casino profits, tribal leaders insist that the Freedmen were never actually citizens and that they will never attain the honor of membership because they don't have Native American blood.
By Brendan I. Koerner, Wired

August 1, 2005
Historians want rewrite on slave revolt
A war party burned 21 plantations along the St. Johns River in 1836, making off with hundreds of slaves and permanently crippling the North Florida sugar industry. Was the uprising in North Florida the largest of its kind in U.S. history?
By Thomas Lake, Florida Times-Union

July 27, 2005
Scholars overlooked largest U.S. slave rebellion for more than 167 years
Since 1838, scholars have overlooked the largest slave rebellion in U.S. history and their reference works have been wrong, shows a new historical Web site.
News release

July 21, 2005
Web site chronicles little-known Fla. slave revolt
As President Andrew Jackson sought to push Florida's Indians west and capture Black Seminoles to return them to slavery, the allies quietly slipped into Florida's plantations along the St. Johns River, west of St. Augustine, with a warning: "A war is coming."
By Scott McCabe, The Palm Beach Post

June 29, 2004
Seminole Freedmen rebuffed by Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to allow the Seminole Freedmen to sue the federal government without the Seminole Nation's involvement. The Freedmen are trying to gain access and services provided by a $56 million settlement awarded to the Seminole Nation.
Indianz.com

December 27, 2003
Seminoles With African Ancestry: The Right To Heritage
There has been an ongoing debate among Seminoles with African ancestry and Seminoles with Native American ancestry regarding the legitimacy of the "Black Seminoles." The arguments have reached crisis proportions as families have split long racial lines, Blacks Seminoles have been voted out of tribal councils and can no longer fully participate in life as a Seminole and some have even lost rights altogether in the Seminole nation.
By Bakari Akil II, The Black World Today

August 17, 2003
Blacks with Indian blood seek tribes' recognition
[No link available. Access by registering and searching at The Oklahoman archives.]
There has been an ongoing debate among Seminoles with African ancestry and Seminoles with Native American ancestry regarding the legitimacy of the "Black Seminoles." The arguments have reached crisis proportions as families have split long racial lines, Blacks Seminoles have been voted out of tribal councils and can no longer fully participate in life as a Seminole and some have even lost rights altogether in the Seminole nation.
By Ron Jackson, The Oklahoman

January 27, 2003
Tracing Bahamian Black Seminoles
University of Central Florida assistant professor Rosalyn Howard documents the present and past of Black Seminoles who emigrated to Andros Island in "Black Seminoles in the Bahamas," written after a year of living with the Black Seminole community in Red Bays.
News release

July 10, 2002
A Nation Divided
Indian tribes across the country are reaping windfall profits these days, usually from gambling operations. But some, like the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, are getting rich from from belated government payouts for lands taken hundreds of years ago. Now the government is paying the tribe $56 million for those lost Florida lands, and the money is threatening to divide a nation.
CBS News, "60 Minutes"

August 20, 2001
Searching for Peliklakaha, land of the forgotten Seminoles
Forty-five minutes west of Walt Disney's make-believe history, archaeologists dig for real artifacts. Hunched over a shallow, square excavation, they search for Peliklakaha, the largest Black Seminole village known to historians, a place where different cultures joined in a fight for freedom more than 200 years ago.
By Scott McCabe, The Palm Beach Post

June 17, 2001
Florida researchers launch first excavation of Black Seminole town
The first ever excavation of a black Seminole town is under way in Central Florida and may unearth how the runaway slaves actually lived within the embattled Seminole Indian nation, says a University of Florida researcher.
News release

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